Why body neutral is the new positive

Clothes, hairstyles, music, and food – everything goes through a phase of being fashionable, and that includes body shape and size.

We’re experiencing a new movement, Body Positivity: loving our bodies, accepting its flaws, its wobbles, celebrating our stretch marks. This is great topsyturvysoftplay.com stuff. It’s a huge step from people feeling ashamed of the way they look; feeling like they don’t look like that girl in the magazine.

You know what though, I’m not sold on this ‘Body Positivity’ business.

I saw a post on Facebook recently, comparing an image of Marilyn Monroe in her hey-day to a very slender woman more recently. It said “Since when did sexy go from this (Marilyn) to this (slender woman)?

Hmm.

Not sure about this. It is fantastic to celebrate bodies, their unique differences, and I absolutely agree that there is no one ideal shape.

But saying one woman is sexy and the other not, that is not okay. In fact, that’s still body shaming. I see that as harmful as walking up to someone overweight and telling them they’re not beautiful. It is the same thing.

Why are we focusing so much on our bodies anyway? Telling everyone to LOVE their flaws, posting videos which show 30 second transformations (a teenage gym-goer flexing her abdominals, side by side her standing relaxed) – this is still emphasising that what we LOOK LIKE is the most important thing about us. There are definitely things I don’t ‘love’ about my body. On the same vein, there are also things about my personality I don’t love.

The truth is, our perfect or imperfect thighs are not the most interesting things about us, and I for one don’t need to have full body acceptance because there are more important things in this world to me. Such as being a good friend, working hard, helping others, and making sure the world knows what I’m eating for lunch today (why deny it?)

Yes, we’re taking a step forward churchsoftwareguide.net in the right direction – but maybe having a more body neutral approach might be where we need to head to next.